Species

Acaena pallida

Etymology

Acaena: From the Greek 'akanthos' thorn, referring to the spiny calyx that many species have
pallida: From the Latin pallidus 'pale or pallid'

Common Name(s)

sand piripiri, sand bidibid

Current Conservation Status

2012 - Not Threatened

Conservation status of New Zealand indigenous vascular plants, 2012
The conservation status of all known New Zealand vascular plant taxa at the rank of species and below were reassessed in 2012 using the New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS). This report includes a statistical summary and brief notes on changes since 2009 and replaces all previous NZTCS lists for vascular plants. Authors: Peter J. de Lange, Jeremy R. Rolfe, Paul D. Champion, Shannel P. Courtney, Peter B. Heenan, John W. Barkla, Ewen K. Cameron, David A. Norton and Rodney A. Hitchmough. File size: 792KB

Previous Conservation Status

2009 - Not Threatened
2004 - Not Threatened

Authority

Acaena pallida (Kirk) Allan

Family

Rosaceae

Flora Category

Vascular - Native

Structural Class

Dicotyledonous Herbs other than Composites

Distribution

Indigenous. Southern North and South Islands, Stewart and Chatham Islands. Also S.E. Australia and Tasmania

Flower Colours

Red / Pink

Chromosome No.

2n = 42

Endemic Taxon

No

Endemic Genus

No

Endemic Family

No

Life Cycle and Dispersal

Spiny hypanthia are dispersed by attaching to fur, feathers and clothing and possibly also dispersed by wind and granivory (Thorsen et al., 2009)

 

   

References and further reading

Thorsen, M. J.; Dickinson, K. J. M.; Seddon, P. J. 2009. Seed dispersal systems in the New Zealand flora. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics 2009 Vol. 11 No. 4 pp. 285-309

This page last updated on 4 Dec 2014